Olive oil

Whole Egg Mayo With Olive Oil & Coconut Oil

Whole Egg Mayo

I love homemade mayo, but I don’t use it often enough to keep on hand so I usually end up giving it  away. In the past I had made several attempts to use only Extra Virgin olive oil as it is the healthiest, as opposed to light olive oil or “vegetable” oils. It was very heavy and bitter, but as a foundation to my homemade garlic sauce, it was pretty good.

I had seen on pintrest ideas of combing half and half EV olive oil and EV coconut oil. I was afraid that  the coconut oil would harden as it sat in the fridge but it didn’t. It was still smooth and creamy after it cooled down. The color might me a little alarming if you’ve only seen white mayo, but the taste is amazing!

When I consume raw eggs, I only use my own eggs from my backyard or from a local farmer that I trust.

Note: Only use high quality eggs when consuming raw eggs. Store bought eggs carry potential risks of salmonella.

The whole process of blending takes about 5 minutes, it cannot be rushed, or you will have failed results (experience).

Ingredients:

  • 2 whole eggs that are free-range, at room temperature
  • 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice or apple cider vinegar, at room temperature
  • ½ tsp. unrefined salt
  • ½ C EV olive oil
  • ½ C EV coconut oil

 Instructions:

  1. Have all ingredients measured out and ready to go near a blender. In a measuring cup with a spout, pour the 2 oils in preparation of use.
  2. Put the eggs in a blender with 1 tsp. of the lemon juice or ACV and blend on a low setting. DO NOT TURN THE BLENDER OFF UNTIL DONE.
  3. Take off the small lid or lid of the blender and slowly pour the oils in a very thin stream, even drop by drop to start out with. If you pour it too fast, it will separate and will be unsuccessful.
  4. Keep pouring in a thin stream, as it thickens, you can pour the oil faster.
  5. Once the mayonnaise is a thick consistency and begins to “choke”, add the rest of the lemon juice or ACV and salt. Blend a few more seconds and you’re finished.
  6. Use a spatula to scrape out the mayo from your blender and store in a glass jar in the fridge.

This mayo will last about a week in the fridge.

Keeping Your Nails Healthy

Healthy Nails

Your nails play an important role, serving to protect your fingers and improve dexterity.

Healthy fingernails are generally smooth, and uniform in colour. They should be free of spots, ridges, dents or discoloration. If your nails don’t look so great it could just be because of lack of regular care and attention, but it could also be an indication of an underlying condition – such as a fungal infection – that requires attention.

Nails are composed of laminated layers of a protein called keratin, which is also found in your hair and skin. They grow from the area under the cuticle (matrix). As the new cells grow, older cells become hard and compacted and are eventually pushed out toward your fingertips.

Each nail comprises several parts:

Nail plate – the hard, most visible part of your nail.

Nail folds – the skin that frames each nail plate on three sides.

Nail bed – the skin beneath the nail plate. Cells at the base of your nail bed produce the fingernail or toenail plate.

Lunula – the whitish, half-moon shape at the base of your nail underneath the plate.

Nails grow at a rate of about 0.1 mm a day, so it takes a fingernail about four to six months for it to regenerate fully.

Taking care of your nails

Nails need moisture just like your skin does. Rub lotion or healthy essential and healthy oils into your nails when moisturising your hands. Be sure to apply a moisturiser each time you wash your hands.

Massaging moisturiser into the nails and cuticles encourages healthy circulation, which means that oxygenated blood, full of nutrients reaches the hair and nails.

Remember also to protect hands and nails by wearing rubber gloves whenever you do the dishes or are doing cleaning work that brings your hands into contact with water and harsh detergents for prolonged periods of time. Wear protective gloves when gardening and doing household chores as well.

In addition:

• Don’t bite your nails or pick at your cuticles. These habits can damage the nail bed. Even a minor cut alongside your nail can allow bacteria or fungi to enter and cause an infection. Because your nails grow very slowly, an injured nail will retain signs of an injury for several months.

• Trim your fingernails and clean under the nails regularly. Use sharp manicure scissors or clippers and an emery board to smooth nail edges.

Never pull off hangnails; doing so almost always results in ripping living tissue. Instead clip hangnails off, leaving a slight angle outward.

A healthy diet

Your diet will have an influence on the health of your skin and nails. Increase your intake of EFAs which nourish your nails, EFA oils can also be used on your nails.

For healthy nails eat high quality protein foods such as legumes, nuts, and seeds. Eat foods that are high in B vitamins.

Also remember to drink plenty of water since a hydrated body encourages healthy hair and nails.

A natural manicure

When grooming your nails keep them nails short, square ­shaped and slightly rounded on top.

If your nails are very brittle try trimming them after a bath or a 15-minute hand-soak in a warm oil such as evening primrose, olive or avocado, then apply a moisturiser.

Several times a week, moisturise your nails and cuticles at bedtime with a warm oil, such as wheatgerm or avocado, then wear cotton gloves to encourage the absorption of moisture and nutrients from the oil.

If you use a nail hardener, try to avoid products which contain toluene sulphonamide or formaldehyde, as they are toxic and can cause irritation.

Most nail polish contains highly toxic chemical ingredients, so use only occasionally and sparingly. Avoid removers that use acetone, which dries nails and cuticles.

Make it yourself

You can create your own using a healthy nail oil, such as olive oil, and adding essential oils. Lavender and myrrh are good choices, to encourage circulation and promote healing. If you have hangnails or any areas of redness, use tea tree oil to fight infection. See also our recipes below for a luxurious natural hand and nail care.

Cuticle cream

This nourishing cream will soften cuticles and discourage hangnails.

  • 1 tsp natural clay
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 3 drops lavender oil

Mix into a paste and put into a sterile ointment jar or small pot. Massage into nails and cuticles.

Honey hand exfoliator

Stimulate the circulation in your hands, remove dead skin cells and nourish your skin and nails with this delicious home-made exfoliator.

  • 1 tbl honey
  • 1 tbl cornmeal or finely grated oatmeal
  • 2 tbl whipping cream
  • 2 drops lemon oil

Combine ingredients in a small jar, apply to hands or feet and rub gently. For added softness, leave on for 5-10 minutes. Rinse and gently pat dry.

 

Keeping Your Nails Healthy

Healthy Nails

Your nails play an important role, serving to protect your fingers and improve dexterity.

Healthy fingernails are generally smooth, and uniform in colour. They should be free of spots, ridges, dents or discoloration. If your nails don’t look so great it could just be because of lack of regular care and attention, but it could also be an indication of an underlying condition – such as a fungal infection – that requires attention.

Nails are composed of laminated layers of a protein called keratin, which is also found in your hair and skin. They grow from the area under the cuticle (matrix). As the new cells grow, older cells become hard and compacted and are eventually pushed out toward your fingertips.

Each nail comprises several parts:

Nail plate – the hard, most visible part of your nail.

Nail folds – the skin that frames each nail plate on three sides.

Nail bed – the skin beneath the nail plate. Cells at the base of your nail bed produce the fingernail or toenail plate.

Lunula – the whitish, half-moon shape at the base of your nail underneath the plate.

Nails grow at a rate of about 0.1 mm a day, so it takes a fingernail about four to six months for it to regenerate fully.

Taking care of your nails

Nails need moisture just like your skin does. Rub lotion or healthy essential and healthy oils into your nails when moisturising your hands. Be sure to apply a moisturiser each time you wash your hands.

Massaging moisturiser into the nails and cuticles encourages healthy circulation, which means that oxygenated blood, full of nutrients reaches the hair and nails.

Remember also to protect hands and nails by wearing rubber gloves whenever you do the dishes or are doing cleaning work that brings your hands into contact with water and harsh detergents for prolonged periods of time. Wear protective gloves when gardening and doing household chores as well.

In addition:

• Don’t bite your nails or pick at your cuticles. These habits can damage the nail bed. Even a minor cut alongside your nail can allow bacteria or fungi to enter and cause an infection. Because your nails grow very slowly, an injured nail will retain signs of an injury for several months.

• Trim your fingernails and clean under the nails regularly. Use sharp manicure scissors or clippers and an emery board to smooth nail edges.

Never pull off hangnails; doing so almost always results in ripping living tissue. Instead clip hangnails off, leaving a slight angle outward.

A healthy diet

Your diet will have an influence on the health of your skin and nails. Increase your intake of EFAs which nourish your nails, EFA oils can also be used on your nails.

For healthy nails eat high quality protein foods such as legumes, nuts, and seeds. Eat foods that are high in B vitamins.

Also remember to drink plenty of water since a hydrated body encourages healthy hair and nails.

A natural manicure

When grooming your nails keep them nails short, square ­shaped and slightly rounded on top.

If your nails are very brittle try trimming them after a bath or a 15-minute hand-soak in a warm oil such as evening primrose, olive or avocado, then apply a moisturiser.

Several times a week, moisturise your nails and cuticles at bedtime with a warm oil, such as wheatgerm or avocado, then wear cotton gloves to encourage the absorption of moisture and nutrients from the oil.

If you use a nail hardener, try to avoid products which contain toluene sulphonamide or formaldehyde, as they are toxic and can cause irritation.

Most nail polish contains highly toxic chemical ingredients, so use only occasionally and sparingly. Avoid removers that use acetone, which dries nails and cuticles.

Make it yourself

You can create your own using a healthy nail oil, such as olive oil, and adding essential oils. Lavender and myrrh are good choices, to encourage circulation and promote healing. If you have hangnails or any areas of redness, use tea tree oil to fight infection. See also our recipes below for a luxurious natural hand and nail care.

Cuticle cream

This nourishing cream will soften cuticles and discourage hangnails.

  • 1 tsp natural clay
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 3 drops lavender oil

Mix into a paste and put into a sterile ointment jar or small pot. Massage into nails and cuticles.

Honey hand exfoliator

Stimulate the circulation in your hands, remove dead skin cells and nourish your skin and nails with this delicious home-made exfoliator.

  • 1 tbl honey
  • 1 tbl cornmeal or finely grated oatmeal
  • 2 tbl whipping cream
  • 2 drops lemon oil

Combine ingredients in a small jar, apply to hands or feet and rub gently. For added softness, leave on for 5-10 minutes. Rinse and gently pat dry.

 

Quiona Lettuce Tacos

quinoa lettuce tacos

We had some cooked quinoa that had to be eaten, so we looked around and saw what we had on hand and came up with these; quinoa and beans, topped with avocado and cultured salsa layered in romaine lettuce…..so GOOD!

Ingredints:

soaked and cooked quinoa

re-fried beans (or plain soaked-cooked beans)

avocado or guacamole

fermented salsa (recipe coming soon), or you could use any salsa, or my recipe here.

Optional; grated cheese, cilantro

Instructions:

Assemble just like you would a taco, it’s pretty simple. You can’t go wrong.

Note:

These would actually make a good portable food as long as they weren’t moved around a lot. They can be eaten at room temp.

 

Super Tonic – High Iron – Digestive Drink; Beet Kvass

Beet Kvass

beet kvass

This recipe was taken from my book A Closer Look At Nutrition & Wellness – Handbook of Digestive Health for Well-being

The tradition of drinking kvass comes from Ukraine. It has over 20 different beneficial probiotics, iron rich and b-vitamin. Beet kvass has all the benefits of beets along with the benefits of fermented foods for a deeply cleansing tonic.

Benefits of Beet Kvass (some benefits): 

  • Helps alleviate inflammation which may contribute to cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes.
  • Serves as an excellent tonic to promote good digestion and overall wellness
  • Helps detox from radiation and toxin exposure
  • Used as a cancer therapy throughout Europe and is frequently recommended to cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy .
  • Beet Kvass is also a good source of natural iodine
  • Beet kvass cleanses the liver
  • Helps with allergies  

One 4-ounce glass of beet kvass each morning and night is said to be an excellent blood tonic, digestive regulator, blood alkalizer, liver cleanser and overall healing tonic.

 *This recipe is for a small batch, it can be multiplied as needed.

Equipment Needed:

1 quart size glass jar with a tight fitting lid

Ingredients:

2 Tbs. whey

1 teaspoons unrefined sea salt

2 medium beets (peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes)

Filtered water

Instructions:

  1. Place all ingredients in a quart sized jar, put the lid on and shake well.
  2. Leave the jar on a counter or in a cupboard at room temperature for 3 -7 days (3 days if your kitchen is hot).
  3. Strain the liquid, leaving the beets in the bottom of the Mason jar and repeat the 3 steps by adding the same amount of water, whey and salt. But discard the beets after the second time. 

The taste is acquired, unless you already like beets. Best when served cold. Will stay fresh tasting for about 1 week in the refrigerator.